Eco-friendly fashions: Organic Cotton

With everyone making a change to ‘Go Green’ these days, some people may wonder: “Who and What are we really helping?”. Other than the environment, you are helping, well, everyone! The textiles industry is evolving towards an organic approach more and more everyday and for good reason. With cotton being the number one, most popular textile used world-wide, the benefits of going organic with our favorite fabric is essential to the evolution of the fashion industry.

Envirosax Organic Cotton, $20 endless.com

FUN FACTS:

Organic Cotton Saves Lives: Non- organic cotton has chemicals upon chemicals used in its production. Non-organic cotton production uses 10% of the pesticides and 22% of the insecticides used globally. WOW! Not only are these chemicals harmful for you, but also to the workers who cultivate and pick this cotton. How about this for perspective: 20,000 agricultural workers die annually from chemicals used in non-organic cotton production.

Environmentally friendly: It takes roughly around 1/3 of a pound of cotton to produce one t-shirt and only 10% of the chemicals applied to that non-organic cotton accomplish their tasks. This means that the other 90% of chemicals were simply absorbed into the plant, the air, the soil, the water, and eventually absorbed by YOU!

Fashion-friendly: You don’t have to scrimp on trends and fashion to be green. Many clothing lines and designers are adopting organic cotton clothing. You can be just as trendy without the shame. A few of my favorite organic cotton clothing lines are: People Tree, Levi’s, EDUN, and Anvil Knitwear, just to name a few.

So what are you waiting for?

ORGANIC PRODUCT PICKS:

EDUN Jacquard Sweater Leggings; $167 revolveclothing.com

People Tree ‘Zakee Shariff’ Jersey dress in Paisley; $81 asos.com

J Brand Monroe Trousers in Woodstock; $60 chickdowntown.com

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One thought on “Eco-friendly fashions: Organic Cotton

  1. I agree with you on the importance of organic cotton and how it helps farmers… but why are the clothes so expensive?

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